Category: particularly those speaking to your independent and dependent variables. Make tables in Word of ALL your findings – Describe at least two limitations (thing homework solution

Make at least two charts of your findings, particularly those speaking to your independent and dependent variables. Make tables in Word of ALL your findings – Describe at least two limitations (thing homework solution

Make at least two charts of your findings, particularly those speaking to your independent and dependent variables. Make tables in Word of ALL your findings – Describe at least two limitations (thing homework solution

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Interview? : Interview  This may be done via the phone or zoom/etc. This does not have to be done in person. Just remember to record it. Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions, describe strategies used in collaboration and partnership among organizations focused on public health goals, describe prioritization of individual, organizational and community concerns and resources for public health programs and policy Instructions: Public health is a field in which good health of the entire population is a goal. As a result, public health officials fight for the health care of all individuals on a daily basis. The elimination of health disparities and treatment of health as a right for everyone is a key part of public health. You have been assigned the task of interviewing an elected official, public health official, agency head, a leader from special interest and advocacy groups, an academic expert, and other policy and corporate leaders. Interview guide is provided below. Record responses with any type of audio recorder and take detailed notes. Chose a subset of topics from the list provided below. It is highly recommended to make an audio recording of the interview and it is required to take detailed notes during the interview. To receive credit students must submit the transcript of the interview, and summary of their findings for evaluation. Topics:  Physical activity and fitness, nutrition, tobacco use, substance abuse, family planning, mental health, injury prevention, violence prevention, educational and community based programs, occupational safety and health, environmental health, food safety, medical product safety, oral health, maternal and infant health, heart disease and stroke, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations, infectious diseases, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, asthma & other respiratory diseases, child health, population health disparities (people with disabilities, racial and ethnic populations), access to quality health care (preventive care, primary care, emergency services, long-term care and rehabilitative services), access to health information, public health system issues (health costs and expenditures, laboratory services, workforce training, performance standards, enforcement of regulations, surveillance and data systems, research and evaluation, public health policy) ** Please be sure to use the interview guide below Interview Guide Introduction: My name is______________. I am a graduate student at ____________. The purpose of this interview is to collect information to help me learn firsthand how you, your agency/organization, address current public health concerns. 1. What health issues are of greatest concern to your organization, agency, yourself…?…to your constituency or members? … to your community? … and to those with whom you work? (Interviewer: follow up on concerns of others as appropriate to the organization or the person’s role; clarify as needed whether the person is speaking for the organization,(preferred)or for him/herself) Prompts (pick 1-3 topics; you are not required to discuss all of these): Physical activity and fitness, nutrition, tobacco use, substance abuse, family planning, mental health, injury prevention, violence prevention, educational and community based programs, occupational safety and health, environmental health, food safety, medical product safety, oral health, maternal and infant health, heart disease and stroke, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations, infectious diseases, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, asthma & other respiratory diseases, child health, population health disparities (people with disabilities, racial and ethnic populations), access to quality health care (preventive care, primary care, emergency services, long-term care and rehabilitative services), access to health information, public health system issues (health costs and expenditures, laboratory services, workforce training, performance standards, enforcement of regulations, surveillance and data systems, research and evaluation, public health policy) 2. How do you feel public health issues relate to what you do in your organization, agency, yourself…? 3. What has your organization/agency done to address health issues? (For those with many health activities, what are the most important ways your organization has addressed health issues?) Prompts: Assisted with policy development, provided resources (money, labor, and supplies), developed and implemented programs (screenings, health fairs, educational classes, wellness programs, etc.), community mobilization, information, enforcement, etc. 4. How did you choose what you are doing to address health issues? Prompts: Received funding, due to policy or legislation, findings from a needs assessment, agency strategic plans, worker demand or expectation, constituency or public interest, direction of leaders, etc. 5. Where do you find out about health issues that you address (or that you are interested in)? 6. Where or from whom do you get your ideas for health-related programs or policies? Prompts: Local hospital, national initiatives, your organization/agency (initiatives, strategic plans, national or state headquarters), state agencies, universities, health department, personal experience, physician or nurse, religious leader, elected officials, journal articles, reports & plans from other groups (community organizations, government, advocacy groups, associations, conferences & training programs), grants or funders, newsletters, Internet, media 7. What are the greatest barriers to promoting policy change? How would/do you address them? Prompts: Resources, support, making it seem relevant, enormity of the task, etc. 8. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Constitution states”…the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being…”How do you feel about this statement? Thank you for your input. This concludes our interview.

Interview 
This may be done via the phone or zoom/etc. This does not have to be done in person. Just remember to record it.
Learning Objectives: Students will be able to:

identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions,
describe strategies used in collaboration and partnership among organizations focused on public health goals,
describe prioritization of individual, organizational and community concerns and resources for public health programs and policy

Instructions:
Public health is a field in which good health of the entire population is a goal. As a result, public health officials fight for the health care of all individuals on a daily basis. The elimination of health disparities and treatment of health as a right for everyone is a key part of public health. You have been assigned the task of interviewing an elected official, public health official, agency head, a leader from special interest and advocacy groups, an academic expert, and other policy and corporate leaders. Interview guide is provided below. Record responses with any type of audio recorder and take detailed notes.
Chose a subset of topics from the list provided below. It is highly recommended to make an audio recording of the interview and it is required to take detailed notes during the interview. To receive credit students must submit the transcript of the interview, and summary of their findings for evaluation.
Topics:  Physical activity and fitness, nutrition, tobacco use, substance abuse, family planning, mental health, injury prevention, violence prevention, educational and community based programs, occupational safety and health, environmental health, food safety, medical product safety, oral health, maternal and infant health, heart disease and stroke, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations, infectious diseases, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, asthma & other respiratory diseases, child health, population health disparities (people with disabilities, racial and ethnic populations), access to quality health care (preventive care, primary care, emergency services, long-term care and rehabilitative services), access to health information, public health system issues (health costs and expenditures, laboratory services, workforce training, performance standards, enforcement of regulations, surveillance and data systems, research and evaluation, public health policy)
** Please be sure to use the interview guide below
Interview Guide
Introduction: My name is______________. I am a graduate student at ____________. The purpose of this interview is to collect information to help me learn firsthand how you, your agency/organization, address current public health concerns.
1. What health issues are of greatest concern to your organization, agency, yourself…?…to your constituency or members? … to your community? … and to those with whom you work?
(Interviewer: follow up on concerns of others as appropriate to the organization or the person’s role; clarify as needed whether the person is speaking for the organization,(preferred)or for him/herself)
Prompts (pick 1-3 topics; you are not required to discuss all of these): Physical activity and fitness, nutrition, tobacco use, substance abuse, family planning, mental health, injury prevention, violence prevention, educational and community based programs, occupational safety and health, environmental health, food safety, medical product safety, oral health, maternal and infant health, heart disease and stroke, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations, infectious diseases, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, asthma & other respiratory diseases, child health, population health disparities (people with disabilities, racial and ethnic populations), access to quality health care (preventive care, primary care, emergency services, long-term care and rehabilitative services), access to health information, public health system issues (health costs and expenditures, laboratory services, workforce training, performance standards, enforcement of regulations, surveillance and data systems, research and evaluation, public health policy)
2. How do you feel public health issues relate to what you do in your organization, agency, yourself…?
3. What has your organization/agency done to address health issues? (For those with many health activities, what are the most important ways your organization has addressed health issues?)
Prompts: Assisted with policy development, provided resources (money, labor, and supplies), developed and implemented programs (screenings, health fairs, educational classes, wellness programs, etc.), community mobilization, information, enforcement, etc.
4. How did you choose what you are doing to address health issues?
Prompts: Received funding, due to policy or legislation, findings from a needs assessment, agency strategic plans, worker demand or expectation, constituency or public interest, direction of leaders, etc.
5. Where do you find out about health issues that you address (or that you are interested in)?
6. Where or from whom do you get your ideas for health-related programs or policies?
Prompts: Local hospital, national initiatives, your organization/agency (initiatives, strategic plans, national or state headquarters), state agencies, universities, health department, personal experience, physician or nurse, religious leader, elected officials, journal articles, reports & plans from other groups (community organizations, government, advocacy groups, associations, conferences & training programs), grants or funders, newsletters, Internet, media
7. What are the greatest barriers to promoting policy change?
How would/do you address them?
Prompts: Resources, support, making it seem relevant, enormity of the task, etc.
8. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Constitution states”…the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being…”How do you feel about this statement?
Thank you for your input. This concludes our interview.

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