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Personal Statement Homework Solution

Personal Statement Homework Solution

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Training and development : QUESTION 2 What      should be considered when evaluating a training room?      Your response must be at least 75 words in length. REASONS FOR EVALUATING TRAINING Companies are investing millions of dollars in training programs to help gain a competitive advantage. Companies invest in training because learning creates knowledge; often, it is this knowledge that distinguishes successful companies and employees from those who are not. Research summarizing the results of studies that have examined the linkage between training and human resource outcomes (such as attitudes and motivation, behaviors, and human capital), organizational performance outcomes (performance and productivity), or financial outcomes (profits and financial indicators) has found that companies that conduct training are likely to have more positive human resource outcomes and greater performance outcomes.1 The influence of training is largest for organizational performance outcomes and human resource outcomes and weakest for financial outcomes. This result is not surprising, given that training can least affect an organization’s financial performance and may do so through its influence on human resource practices. As emphasized in Chapter Two, “Strategic Training,” training is more strongly related to organizational outcomes when it is matched with the organization’s business strategy and capital intensity. Because companies have made large dollar investments in training and education and view training as a strategy to be successful, they expect the outcomes or benefits related to training to be measurable. Norton Health Care’s Practice Manager Development Program focuses on improving practice managers’ leadership, practice operations, patient access to care, and patient experience.2 Program participants share best practices, learn from company leaders, and build a plan for their practice operations. The program has resulted in an increase in the number of new patients accepted, office visits, and patients responding “definitely recommend” on customer surveys following an office visit. At Jiffy Lube, training evaluation involves more than just counting the number of programs employees attend each year.3 Jiffy Lube’s page 256business depends on properly servicing customers’ cars so they are satisfied and will be repeat customers. As a result, Jiffy Lube employees must be certified to perform a service. Jiffy Lube tracks both certifications and their relationship to business results. They track both employee and store-level certifications. Entry-level certifications must be completed within 30 days after an employee is hired. Seventy-six percent of Jiffy Lube’s stores are at 80 to 100 percent certification. Of those stores with 100 percent certification, one-third have average customer sales 9 percent higher than all stores. Training evaluation provides a way to understand the investment that training produces and provides the information needed to improve training.4 If a company receives an inadequate return on its investment in training, the company will likely reduce its investment in training or look for training providers outside the company who can provide training experiences that improve performance, productivity, customer satisfaction, or whatever other outcomes the company is interested in achieving. Training evaluation provides the data needed to demonstrate that training does offer benefits to the company. Training evaluation involves both formative and summative evaluation.5 Formative Evaluation Formative evaluation refers to the evaluation of training that takes place during program design and development. That is, formative evaluation helps ensure that (1) the training program is well organized and runs smoothly, and (2) trainees learn and are satisfied with the program. Formative evaluation provides information about how to make the program better; it usually involves collecting qualitative data about the program. Qualitative data include opinions, beliefs, and feelings about the program. Formative evaluations ask customers, employees, managers, and subject-matter experts (SMEs) their opinions on the description of the training content and objectives and the program design. These people are also asked to evaluate the clarity and ease of use of a part of the training program that is demonstrated to them in the way that it will be delivered (e.g., online, face-to-face, or using video).6 The formative evaluation is conducted either individually or in groups before the program is made available to the rest of the company. Trainers may also be involved to measure the time requirements of the program. As a result of the formative evaluation, training content may be changed to be more accurate, easier to understand, or more appealing. The training method can be adjusted to improve learning (e.g., provide trainees with more opportunities to practice or give feedback). Also, introducing the training program as early as possible to managers and customers helps in getting them to buy into the program, which is critical for their role in helping employees learn and transfer skills. It also allows their concerns to be addressed before the program is implemented. Formative evaluation involves pilot testing. Pilot testing refers to the process of previewing the training program with potential trainees and managers or with other customers (persons who are paying for the development of the program). Pilot testing can be used as a “dress rehearsal” to show the program to managers, trainees, and customers. It should also be used for formative evaluation. For example, a group of potential trainees and their managers may be asked to preview or pilot test a web-based training program. As they complete the program, trainees and managers may be asked to provide their opinions about whether graphics, videos, or music used in the program contributed to (or interfered with) learning. They may also be asked how easy it was to move through the program and complete the exercises, and they may be asked to evaluate the quality of feedback the training page 257program provided after they completed the exercises. The information gained from this preview would be used by program developers to improve the program before it is made available to all employees. St. George Bank developed a new web-based training system for bank tellers.7 Before the program was provided to all bank tellers, it was reviewed by a small group who were considered to be typical users of the program. The tellers provided suggestions for improvement, and the instructional designers incorporated their suggestions into the final version of the program. Summative Evaluation Summative evaluation refers to an evaluation conducted to determine the extent to which trainees have changed as a result of participating in the training program. That is, have trainees acquired knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, or other outcomes identified in the training objectives? Summative evaluation may also include measuring the monetary benefits (also known as return on investment or ROI) that the company receives from the program. Summative evaluation usually involves collecting quantitative (numerical) data through tests, ratings of behavior, or objective measures of performance such as volume of sales, accidents, or patents. From the discussion of summative and formative evaluation, it is probably apparent to you why a training program should be evaluated: 1. To identify the program’s strengths and weaknesses. This includes determining if the program is meeting the learning objectives, if the quality of the learning environment is satisfactory, and if transfer of training to the job is occurring. 2. To assess whether the content, organization, and administration of the program—including the schedule, accommodations, trainers, and materials—contribute to learning and the use of training content on the job. 3. To identify which trainees benefit most or least from the program. 4. To assist in marketing programs through the collection of information from participants about whether they would recommend the program to others, why they attended the program, and their level of satisfaction with the program. 5. To determine the financial benefits and costs of the program. 6. To compare the costs and benefits of training versus nontraining investments (such as work redesign or a better employee selection system). 7. To compare the costs and benefits of different training programs to choose the best program. QUESTION 3 What      are the parts of the evaluation process?      Your response must be at least 75 words in length. Attached document  Question 4: Option Two:  Many training professionals state that questioning is an art and technique that has to be learned, practiced, and mastered to enhance training, measure understanding, and engage trainees.  The military instructor training courses use a method called the “Apple” technique with “ask, pause, pick, listen, & expand” for each letter.  It is an effective technique and really helps engage the students. Discuss what you think each letter means and how it would fit into your training presentation.  Then explain whether you think this is an effective questioning technique and why or why not.

QUESTION 2

What      should be considered when evaluating a training room?

     Your response must be at least 75 words in length.

REASONS FOR EVALUATING TRAINING
Companies are investing millions of dollars in training programs to help gain a competitive advantage. Companies invest in training because learning creates knowledge; often, it is this knowledge that distinguishes successful companies and employees from those who are not. Research summarizing the results of studies that have examined the linkage between training and human resource outcomes (such as attitudes and motivation, behaviors, and human capital), organizational performance outcomes (performance and productivity), or financial outcomes (profits and financial indicators) has found that companies that conduct training are likely to have more positive human resource outcomes and greater performance outcomes.1 The influence of training is largest for organizational performance outcomes and human resource outcomes and weakest for financial outcomes. This result is not surprising, given that training can least affect an organization’s financial performance and may do so through its influence on human resource practices. As emphasized in Chapter Two, “Strategic Training,” training is more strongly related to organizational outcomes when it is matched with the organization’s business strategy and capital intensity. Because companies have made large dollar investments in training and education and view training as a strategy to be successful, they expect the outcomes or benefits related to training to be measurable.
Norton Health Care’s Practice Manager Development Program focuses on improving practice managers’ leadership, practice operations, patient access to care, and patient experience.2 Program participants share best practices, learn from company leaders, and build a plan for their practice operations. The program has resulted in an increase in the number of new patients accepted, office visits, and patients responding “definitely recommend” on customer surveys following an office visit. At Jiffy Lube, training evaluation involves more than just counting the number of programs employees attend each year.3 Jiffy Lube’s page 256business depends on properly servicing customers’ cars so they are satisfied and will be repeat customers. As a result, Jiffy Lube employees must be certified to perform a service. Jiffy Lube tracks both certifications and their relationship to business results. They track both employee and store-level certifications. Entry-level certifications must be completed within 30 days after an employee is hired. Seventy-six percent of Jiffy Lube’s stores are at 80 to 100 percent certification. Of those stores with 100 percent certification, one-third have average customer sales 9 percent higher than all stores.
Training evaluation provides a way to understand the investment that training produces and provides the information needed to improve training.4 If a company receives an inadequate return on its investment in training, the company will likely reduce its investment in training or look for training providers outside the company who can provide training experiences that improve performance, productivity, customer satisfaction, or whatever other outcomes the company is interested in achieving. Training evaluation provides the data needed to demonstrate that training does offer benefits to the company. Training evaluation involves both formative and summative evaluation.5
Formative Evaluation
Formative evaluation refers to the evaluation of training that takes place during program design and development. That is, formative evaluation helps ensure that (1) the training program is well organized and runs smoothly, and (2) trainees learn and are satisfied with the program. Formative evaluation provides information about how to make the program better; it usually involves collecting qualitative data about the program. Qualitative data include opinions, beliefs, and feelings about the program. Formative evaluations ask customers, employees, managers, and subject-matter experts (SMEs) their opinions on the description of the training content and objectives and the program design. These people are also asked to evaluate the clarity and ease of use of a part of the training program that is demonstrated to them in the way that it will be delivered (e.g., online, face-to-face, or using video).6 The formative evaluation is conducted either individually or in groups before the program is made available to the rest of the company. Trainers may also be involved to measure the time requirements of the program. As a result of the formative evaluation, training content may be changed to be more accurate, easier to understand, or more appealing. The training method can be adjusted to improve learning (e.g., provide trainees with more opportunities to practice or give feedback). Also, introducing the training program as early as possible to managers and customers helps in getting them to buy into the program, which is critical for their role in helping employees learn and transfer skills. It also allows their concerns to be addressed before the program is implemented.
Formative evaluation involves pilot testing. Pilot testing refers to the process of previewing the training program with potential trainees and managers or with other customers (persons who are paying for the development of the program). Pilot testing can be used as a “dress rehearsal” to show the program to managers, trainees, and customers. It should also be used for formative evaluation. For example, a group of potential trainees and their managers may be asked to preview or pilot test a web-based training program. As they complete the program, trainees and managers may be asked to provide their opinions about whether graphics, videos, or music used in the program contributed to (or interfered with) learning. They may also be asked how easy it was to move through the program and complete the exercises, and they may be asked to evaluate the quality of feedback the training page 257program provided after they completed the exercises. The information gained from this preview would be used by program developers to improve the program before it is made available to all employees. St. George Bank developed a new web-based training system for bank tellers.7 Before the program was provided to all bank tellers, it was reviewed by a small group who were considered to be typical users of the program. The tellers provided suggestions for improvement, and the instructional designers incorporated their suggestions into the final version of the program.
Summative Evaluation
Summative evaluation refers to an evaluation conducted to determine the extent to which trainees have changed as a result of participating in the training program. That is, have trainees acquired knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, or other outcomes identified in the training objectives? Summative evaluation may also include measuring the monetary benefits (also known as return on investment or ROI) that the company receives from the program. Summative evaluation usually involves collecting quantitative (numerical) data through tests, ratings of behavior, or objective measures of performance such as volume of sales, accidents, or patents.
From the discussion of summative and formative evaluation, it is probably apparent to you why a training program should be evaluated:
1. To identify the program’s strengths and weaknesses. This includes determining if the program is meeting the learning objectives, if the quality of the learning environment is satisfactory, and if transfer of training to the job is occurring.
2. To assess whether the content, organization, and administration of the program—including the schedule, accommodations, trainers, and materials—contribute to learning and the use of training content on the job.
3. To identify which trainees benefit most or least from the program.
4. To assist in marketing programs through the collection of information from participants about whether they would recommend the program to others, why they attended the program, and their level of satisfaction with the program.
5. To determine the financial benefits and costs of the program.
6. To compare the costs and benefits of training versus nontraining investments (such as work redesign or a better employee selection system).
7. To compare the costs and benefits of different training programs to choose the best program.
QUESTION 3

What      are the parts of the evaluation process?

     Your response must be at least 75 words in length.

Attached document 
Question 4: Option Two:  Many training professionals state that questioning is an art and technique that has to be learned, practiced, and mastered to enhance training, measure understanding, and engage trainees.  The military instructor training courses use a method called the “Apple” technique with “ask, pause, pick, listen, & expand” for each letter.  It is an effective technique and really helps engage the students. Discuss what you think each letter means and how it would fit into your training presentation.  Then explain whether you think this is an effective questioning technique and why or why not.

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